Spotted lanternfly egg masses discovered in Maine
SLF
Photo courtesy of Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture

Spotted lanternfly egg masses discovered in Maine

The masses were found on trees from Pennsylvania and planted in Boothbay, Freeport, Northeast Harbor and Yarmouth.

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According to a news report from News Center Maine, spotted lanternfly egg masses were discovered on trees in Maine. Continue to the article, below:

The Maine Department of Agriculture, Conservation and Forestry (DACF) says egg masses of the invasive spotted lanternfly (SLF) were found on trees in Maine. While no live SLFs were found, DACF is encouraging residents to report any sign of the invasive pest. 

According to DACF, the egg masses were found on trees from Pennsylvania, where the species is established, and planted in Boothbay, Freeport, Northeast Harbor and Yarmouth. 

The SLF is an invasive sap-feeding insect from Asia first found in the U.S. in 2014 in Pennsylvania. DACF explains that while the preferred host plant of this pest is tree-of-heaven, SLF attacks over 100 species of trees, shrubs, and vines, and has the potential to impact a broad range of agricultural commodities, including apples, peaches, grapes/wine, maple syrup, as well as the ornamental nursery industry.

Continue to News Center Maine for the full story.