New findings on ambrosia beetle

New findings on ambrosia beetle

A group of researchers is studying ambrosia beetle biology and ecology, in addition to management options for woody plant nurseries.

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July 6, 2016

By Jill Calabro, AmericanHort

Ambrosia beetles are not new insects to the U.S.; many native species exist here that are considered minor pest problems. Many nonnative species can be found here too, and they can be very damaging to nurseries and landscapes. Two species are of greatest concern. The granulate ambrosia beetle, Xylosandrus crassiusculus, and the black timber bark beetle, X. germanus, are both native to southeastern Asia and have established populations in the U.S.

A group of researchers is conducting a multi-year project studying ambrosia beetle biology and ecology, in addition to management options for woody plant nurseries. Dr. Chris Ranger, USDA-Agricultural Research Service (ARS), leads this collaboration of USDA and university entomologists from Maryland, Mississippi, North Carolina, Ohio, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Virginia. Horticultural Research Institute funded a portion of this research through its annual grants program. Additional funding has been provided through the Floriculture and Nursery Research Initiative, a unique partnership of AmericanHort/HRI, SAF, and USDA-ARS.

Click here to read more about their findings and control methods.

Photo: Pest and Diseases Image Library, Bugwood.org