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Grower introduces consumer recycling program

Floral Plant Growers encourages consumers to return plastic flower containers

David Kuack | April 23, 2010

Floral Plant Growers, a VeriFlora-certified grower headquartered in Denmark, Wis., has implemented a consumer recycling program for horticultural plastics at 78 Home Depot and 92 Shopko stores in the Midwest. Consumers are being encouraged to return empty plastic packs, pots and trays to participating stores.
The used plastics will be collected on designated recycling carts. Floral Plant Growers will pick up the full carts and arrange for recycling of the various types of plastics. Most of the plastic will be reground and reused to make new pots, packs and trays.
The company has been reusing and recycling metals, paper, cardboard and plastic used in its greenhouses for over 30 years. The company prevents over 60,000 lbs. of plastic from entering landfills every year by recycling its used plastic.
Floral Plant Growers operates a total of 49 acres of greenhouse production facilities in Wisconsin, Boyden, Iowa, and Richmond, Ind. The company produces retail-ready bedding plants, garden mums and holiday crops, and grower-ready plugs and propagated liners. It produces over 156 million plants annually.

Pictured: Floral Plant Growers has initiated a consumer plastic container recycling at various retail outlets throughout the Midwest.

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