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1st detection of citrus psyllid made in Arizona

Asian citrus psyllid discovered in Arizona, new sites identified in California

David Kuack | December 23, 2009

In October Ariz. Dept. of Ag detected a single adult Asian citrus psyllid (Diaphorina citri) on a trap on a residential citrus tree in the town of San Luis in Yuma County. This detection is the 1st record of the psyllid in Arizona. Further surveys of nearby properties by Ariz. Dept. of Ag and APHIS inspectors revealed additional psyllid adults. Psyllids found to date have tested negative for the presence of citrus greening.
In November Arizona enacted a quarantine for a portion of Yuma County that restricted the movement of regulated psyllid-host articles. APHIS issued a revised Federal Order paralleling the state’s actions, expanding the quarantine area to include a portion of Yuma County.
The psyllid has also been detected in new areas of California, which has resulted in the expansion of the quarantine area to include all of Imperial County, along with portions of Riverside, San Bernardino and San Diego counties. APHIS continues to work with State officials in both states to further delimit the psyllid’s presence while assessing other measures that may be appropriate for these new finds.
 

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