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Dallas-area commercial construction jumps

Commercial contracts up 85% in June

Citybiz Real Estate | August 3, 2011

Contracts for future commercial construction in the Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington Metropolitan statistical jumped 85 percent this past June when compared to June 2010, according to McGraw-Hill Construction.
 
Non-residential construction contracts tracked by McGraw-Hill's Research and Analytics unit totaled nearly $594 million in June 2011, up 85 percent from $321.5M in June 2010.
 
Perhaps it has something to do with the last month of the quarter. March 2011 showed similar numbers, when non-residential construction contracts totaled $535.3 million, up 82 percent from $275.2M in March 2010.
 
Either way, these jumps have helped Dallas overcome less positive numbers from the first quarter, when future construction contracts fell to $895 from $950 million in 2010, a drop of 6 percent.
 
For the first two quarters of 2011, future construction in the metropolitan statistical area totaled just short of $2.13 billion, an increase of 8 percent over the same six months of 2010.
 
McGraw Hill defines commercial real estate construction as commercial, manufacturing, educational, religious, administrative, recreational, hotel, dormitory and other non-residential buildings.
 

The metropolitan statistical area measured included Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington, which consists of Collin, Dallas, Delta, Denton, Ellis, Hunt, Johnson, Kaufman, Parker, Rockwall, Tarrant and Wise in Texas. 

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