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Winners announced in Southern Living Plant Collection’s Facebook ‘Name This Rose’ contest

Plants

Winning monikers are “All A Flutter” and “Majesty”

| July 5, 2011

Plant Development Services, Southern Living and the Southern Living Plant Collection recently announced the winners of a recent “Name This Rose” Contest conducted on the Southern Living Plant Collection Facebook page. Donnette East of Barry, Texas, submitted her winning entry with “Majesty” for a red rose variety, and Sheila Gates of Huntsville, Ala., entered “All A Flutter” for a pink rose variety, according to Kip McConnell, director of PDSI.

The contest was conducted entirely on the Southern Living Plant Collection Facebook page which is updated weekly with gardening advice, event information and real life gardening experiences posted by loyal fans. The Southern Living Plant Collection Facebook page has over 500 fans currently. Southern Living Plant Collection encourages Facebook fans to share their gardening experiences on the page at http://www.facebook.com/pages/Southern-Living-Plant-Collection/108615996233

Both rose varieties will be available spring 2012 in select retail garden centers across the Southeast, joining other outstanding plant varieties in the Collection including crape myrtles, hollies, nandinas, Indian Hawthornes, liriopes and more.

For more information, to request sample plants and to watch video vignettes of plant varieties, please visit www.southernlivingplants.com.

 

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