Friday, November 28, 2014

Home News Alternatives eyed for methyl bromide

Alternatives eyed for methyl bromide

Researchers are looking at alternative treatment that includes molasses

Staff | March 16, 2011

Researchers with USDA's Agricultural Research Service (ARS) are examining whether a cropping system that uses molasses to stimulate microbial activity could be used to replace methyl bromide. They also are studying recently developed fumigants.

ARS scientists Erin Rosskopf and Nancy Kokalis-Burelle and former ARS research associate David Butler raised bell peppers and eggplant at the agency's U.S. Horticultural Research Laboratory in Fort Pierce, Fla., to test a combination of composted broiler litter, molasses and anaerobic soil disinfestation (ASD). In ASD, topsoil is saturated with water and covered with a plastic tarp. Then, a carbon source—in this case molasses—is added to stimulate microbial activity.

The scientists found nematode populations were reduced when treated with molasses and poultry litter, that molasses and poultry litter controlled grass weeds just as well as methyl bromide, and that the solarized treatments heated the soil to levels that were at or just below levels that are lethal for many soil pathogens.

Read more here.

Top news

Home Depot mandates extra tag for neonic-treated plants

Plants treated with neonicotinoids must now bear a special tag.

Obama to Republican critics on immigration: 'Pass a bill'

The President cited the bipartisan immigration bill passed by the U.S. Senate last year and urged the House to take it up.

Plants more sensitive to drought than realized

New research from UCLA will improve predictions of which plant species will survive drought.

Mark Weathington named director of JC Raulston Arboretum

Weathington joined JCRA in 2007 as assistant director and curator of collections.

x